International Short Film Festival 2007, Independent Films on Iran

Awards Winners

  1. Iranian Miniature (1958)
    • Writer/Director:Writer/Director: Feri (Mostafa) Farzaneh
    • Camera: Bernard Taisant
    • Sound: Emil Renard
    • Music:F. Payvar, Daryoush Safvat, Emad Ram (Flute), H. Dahlavi (Santour)
    • Editor: Francine Vainer
    • Narrator: Roger Lescot
    • Producer: Alain Raygot
    • Production: Chanzel
    • France, 20 min., Color, 1958
    • Award: Thirty thousand French francs in France
    • Selected for the Venice International Film Festival
    Synopsis:

    A documentary detailing the history of Persian miniature art.

    About the filmmaker:

    Mostafa Farzaneh is a journalist, writer and filmmaker who opened the heavy gates of the major film festivals to Iranian films. He was born in 1929 in Tehran. He graduated from Toulouse University with a degree in law and from I.D.H.E.C in Paris in 1957. His first film, Iranian Miniature, was the first Iranian short film to win a cash award in France and was selected for the Venice Film Festival in 1959. His second film, Cyrus the Great, was selected for the Cannes Film Festival in 1961, and his third, The Woman & Animal, won a prize at the Locarno Film Festival in 1962. He has also published a number of novels and translated the work of others.

    top

  2. The Broken Column (Sotune Shekasteh) (1964) Auto-Stop
    • Writer/Director: Houshang Shafti, Mehdi Mirsamadzadeh
    • Camera: Fereydoun Ghovanlou, Shahrokh Golestan
    • Sound: Ghasem Aghasi
    • Editor: Mohammad Mehdi Haydari
    • Iran, 18 min., Color, 1964
    • Awards: Special Diploma, Berlin Film Festival, 1967; Special Mention, Frankfurt Film Festival, 1967; Silver Medal, Documentary Film Festival, Salerno, Italy, 1967
    Synopsis:

    This documentary uses special effects to convey the advent and demise of the Achaemenes (Hakhamaneshian) Dynasty in Persia, and the destruction of its capital, Persepolis, by Alexander the Great.

    About the filmmaker:

    Houshang Shafti was born in Tehran in 1933. He graduated with a degree in directing from a special branch of Syracuse University established in Tehran (1951-1959). He has made numerous documentaries. His most famous short film, Flaming Poppies, garnered the Silver Bear at the Berlin Film Festival in 1964.

    top

  3. Dawn of the Capricorn (Bamdade Jedi) (1964)
    • Writer/Director: Ahmad Faroughi Kadjar
    • Camera: Petros Palian
    • Sound: Bahram Darabi
    • Music: Emad Ram, Simin Manouchehri, Hossein Tehrani
    • Editor: Rouhollah Emami
    • Producer: Ministry of Art & Culture
    • Cast: Davoud Bagheri, Farideh Hariri
    • Iran, 35 min., B&W, 1964
    • Awards: Two Diplomas of Honor :Best Film & Best Technique for Young Adult, Cannes International Film Festival, France, 1964 Subtitled in English IFVC US Premiere
    Synopsis:

    Dawn of the Capricorn, made by Ahmad Faroughi Kadjar (Qajar) in 1964, is a strange composition that looks at the stagnated situation of a country suspended between the old world and the modern era. Nevertheless, while its aim is clear, the message is vague and up to interpretation. Wherever it casts its eye, Faroughi’s camera tries to register this somehow cynical dichotomy. It begins in a theater house in the old city of Isfahan that has staged Shakespeare’s Othello. There is no attentive audience and the players are detached and exhausted. A young man from amongst the audience begins a long journey into the web of narrow alleys of Isfahan and ends up in the main mosque of the city where he meets a young girl. Despite the initial chaotic situations, from its halfway point, the film begins to render a silent observation of a night that will end at the break of dawn. Why Capricorn? This is also open to interpretation.

    About the filmmaker

    Ahmad Faroughi Kadjar was born in Paris in 1938. He studied cinema in France and the United States. He worked for Fox in London for more than year as a script reader. He then went to Iran to work in the Ministry of Art & Culture as a filmmaker. His first documentary was Tehran Today, but it was his second one, the more complex Dawn of the Capricorn, told from the point of a view of a restless young boy, that gained him significant recognition. He died in Paris in 1998.

    top

  4. The Rhythm (Hossein Tehrani and His Drum) (1971)
    • Writer/Director: Manouchehr Tayyab
    • Camera: Taghi Massoumi, A. Dadvar
    • Sound: Ghasem Aghasi
    • Music: Hossein Tehrani
    • Editor: Mohammad Mehdi Haydari
    • Iran, 9 min., B&W, 1971
    • Awards: Bronze Delfan, Tehran International Festival of Educational Film, 1971; Diploma of Honor, Vienna International Film Festival, 1972
    Synopsis:

    Manouchehr Tayyab masterfully combines two images, crosscutting footage of Hossein Tehrani playing a drum with the movement of a train.

    About the filmmaker

    Manouchehr Tayyab was born in Abadan in 1937. He studied architecture and directing in cinema and television at the Academy of Art in Vienna. His film career began with Treitod, a short film made in Vienna in 1958. He returned to Iran in 1963 and started to make short documentaries for the Ministry of Art & Culture. His series of short films about different historical mosques garnered him various national and international prizes. He is a film critic, writer and translator, and currently divides his time between Austria and Iran.

    top

  5. The Mosque Sheikh Lotfollah (1972)
    • Writer/Editor/Director: Manouchehr Tayyab
    • Camera: Naghi Masoumi, A. Kafafi
    • Sound: M. Alemi
    • Music: L. Tcheknavarian
    • Production: National Film Board of Iran
    • Iran, 15 min., Color, 1972
    Synopsis:

    Tayyab skillfully depicts the history and architectural structure of the Mosque Sheikh Lotfollah in Isfahan.

    About the filmmaker

    See above entry for The Rhythm.

    top

Also See

non related images non related images
  • image of IFVC logo
  • Ziba Foundation